Exploring Students’ Self-Assessment to Increase Learning Outcomes in Teachers’ Training Colleges in Cameroon

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.56059/jl4d.v9i2.473

Abstract

The main objective of this study is to explore students’ self-assessment to increase students’ learning outcomes in teacher training colleges in Meme and Fako Divisions. In-depth interviews and group discussions were used as instruments for data collection. Purposive sampling technique was employed in selecting the teacher training colleges used in the study and the participants. The sample size of the study constituted of 37 student-teachers for in-depth interviews and four group discussions made up of ten student-teachers each. The interviews and group discussions were analysed through content analysis, while focus group discussions were analysed following the procedure for analysing and reporting focus group results by Krueger (1998). The findings revealed that self-directed learning can be used to increase students’ learning outcomes; self-designed project influences students’ learning outcomes; self-reported assessment is linked with students’ learning outcomes; and that knowledge of self is related with students’ learning outcomes.

Author Biography

Ngemunang Agnes Ngale Lyonga, Higher Technical Teacher's Training College of the University of Buea

Ngemunang Agnes Ngale Lyonga is Associate Professor of Educational Administration and Planning. Currently she is the Head of Division of Programs at the Postgraduate School of University of Buea, Cameroon. She has been Director of Studies at the Higher Teachers’ Technical College (HTTTC) of the University of Buea and the pioneer Head of Department of the Department of Science of Education at the same College, HTTTC-UB, Cameroon.

Published

2022-07-19

How to Cite

Lyonga, N. A. N. (2022). Exploring Students’ Self-Assessment to Increase Learning Outcomes in Teachers’ Training Colleges in Cameroon. Journal of Learning for Development, 9(2), 317–330. https://doi.org/10.56059/jl4d.v9i2.473

Issue

Section

Case Studies