Future Directions for Digital Literacy Fluency using Cognitive Flexibility Research: A Review of Selected Digital Literacy Paradigms and Theoretical Frameworks

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.56059/jl4d.v9i3.818

Keywords:

cognitive, digital literacy, technology

Abstract

As learners engage, test, and apply new subject knowledge, they often expend their cognitive capacity on the technological tools designed to capture their learning progress and outcomes. The energy and attention spent on these tools reduces their capacity to engage deeply with new learning concepts. Digital literacy skills require both cognitive and technical skills to develop a learner’s ability to locate, use, and communicate information. Increasingly complex information environments create various barriers for student learning, and as our learning and working industries continue to evolve and integrate technologies, students must overcome these barriers by bridging learning needs and technology expectations. This research explores the value of developing digital literacy to improve learners’ cognitive flexibility by decreasing technological cognitive load and increasing learning fluency. The findings highlight the need for establishing scaffolded digital literacy skills and digital tool selection, and expand college readiness requirements to include digital literacy as a prerequisite skill for learners.

Author Biographies

Amy Caton, Texas A&M University

Amy Caton is an Associate Instructional Professor in Liberal Studies at Texas A&M University and a PhD student in Learning Technologies at the University of North Texas. Her research interests are in critical digital literacies for student success in higher education, equitable access to open information systems and architecture, and innovative learning technology for improving global citizenship.

Danita Bradshaw-Wardis , University of North Texas

Danita Bradshaw-Wardis a Biology Instructor at Dallas College and a PhD Student in Learning Technologies at the University of North Texas. Her research interests are digital tool and technology-based learning design, application, and evaluation specifically aimed at STEM and Biology education. Her work explores learning barriers for underrepresented populations aiming to improve STEM success in higher education.

Kinshuk, University of North Texas

Kinshuk is the Dean of the College of Information and Professor in Learning Technologies at the University of North Texas. His work has been dedicated to advancing research on the innovative paradigms, architectures and implementations of online and distance learning systems for individualized and adaptive learning in increasingly global environments.

Wilhelmina Savenye, University of North Texas

Wilhelmina Savenye is an Emeritus Professor of learning design and technology at Arizona State University. She is also a senior education advisor for the NSF-funded engineering research Center for Bio-mediated and Bio-inspired Geotechnics (CBBG), and Associate Graduate Faculty of Learning Technologies at the University of North Texas. Her research interests are design and evaluation of learning environments, including those involving online and digital learning, informal learning, STEM, and technology-integrated instruction.

Published

2022-11-21

How to Cite

Caton, A., Bradshaw-Wardis , D., Kinshuk, K., & Savenye, W. (2022). Future Directions for Digital Literacy Fluency using Cognitive Flexibility Research: A Review of Selected Digital Literacy Paradigms and Theoretical Frameworks. Journal of Learning for Development, 9(3), 381–393. https://doi.org/10.56059/jl4d.v9i3.818

Issue

Section

Invited Articles